PDF/EPUB Edith Hahn Beer Æ Æ The Nazi Officer's Wife How One Jewish Woman Survived The

Edith Hahn was an outspoken young woman studying law in Vienna when the Gestapo forced Edith and her mother into a ghetto issuing them papers branded with a J Soon Edith was taken away to a labor camp and though she convinced Nazi officials to spare her mother when she returned home her mother had been deported Knowing she would become a hunted woman Edith tore the yellow star from her clothing and went underground scavenging for food and searching each night for a safe place to sleep Her boyfriend Pepi proved too terrified to help her but a Christian friend was not With the woman's identity papers in hand Edith fled to Munich There she met Werner Vetter a Nazi party member who fell in love with her And despite her protests and even her eventual confession that she was Jewish he married her and kept her identity secretIn vivid wrenching detail Edith recalls a life of constant almost paralyzing fear She tells of German officials who casually questioned the lineage of her parents of how when giving birth to her daughter she refused all painkillers afraid that in an altered state of mind she might reveal her past and of how after her husband was captured by the Russians and sent to Siberia Edith was bombed out of her house and had to hide in a closet with her daughter while drunken Russians soldiers raped women on the streetYet despite the risk it posed to her life Edith Hahn created a remarkable collective record of survival She saved every set of real and falsified papers letters she received from her lost love Pepi and photographs she managed to take inside labor camps On exhibit at the Holocaust Museum in Washington DC these hundreds of documents form the fabric of an epic story complex troubling and ultimately triumphant


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    I have read a good number of books about the holocaust and most of them were novels I keep reading them because they are gut wrenching and they keep reminding me that it's important for us to acknowledge and remember what happened in those concentration and death camps Reading a memoir like this one only reminds me all the how horrific this history was and that this happened to real peopleThis book is not about the concentration or death camps but it is about the courage and determination of one woman who survived the holocaust as yes a Nazi Officer's wife Because she didn't go to the camps did not mean that Edith didn't experience horrific conditions go hungry or did not suffer physically or mentally She did She was sent from Vienna when the Nazis took over to work as a slave laborer on a farm then at a box factory With bleeding hands little food and despicable living conditions and only the hope of packages and letters from home she manages to surviveThen right in the middle of the Nazis she is defiant brave smart and afraid as she finds ways to make them believe that she is one of them I also loved knowing about the people who helped her It restores my faith in humanity to know of these people who risked their lives to save another human being who happened to be Jewish It is so well written that it almost doesn't feel like a memoir which can sometimes feel just like a reiteration of events and dates This is the story of an amazing woman whose strength and resilience saved her life as well as her daughter’s I love that her daughter convinced her to tell her story otherwise we would not have known about this remarkable woman I am glad that we can remember her We said Heil Hitler In my soul's fastness I prayed Let the beast Hitler be destroyed Let The Americans and the RAF bomb the Nazis to dust Let the German Army freeze at Stalingrad Let me not be forgotten here Let Someone remember who I really am