The Coming of the Horseclans kindle pdf – Multi-channel.co

A Violent, Lusty Saga Of Barbaric Nomads On Their Journey To Reclaim Their Homeland In The Th Century, Post Cataclysmic America MILO OF MORAIover Years Old And Immune To Death By Ordinary Means, He Appears In Fulfillment Of The Prophecy Of The Return To Lead The Tribe Of Horseclansmen Back To Their Homeland By The Sea Aided By Huge, Tigerlike Prairie Cats, And The Vicious Fighting Horses With Whom He Communicates By Mindspeak, Milo And His Thundering Nation On Horseback Battle Their Way EastwardThe Story Is Set In The Twenty Seventh Century AD In A World Still Submerged In Barbarism And Chaos Six Hundred Years Earlier A Succession Of Man Made And Natural Disasters Destroyed Whole Continents And Races, Changing The Face Of The Earth New Empires Are Now Being Formed By Men Who Possess The Savage Fighting Skills Of Their Ancestors Along With Super Normal Mental Powers Of New World Man


10 thoughts on “The Coming of the Horseclans

  1. says:

    Originally reviewed at Bookwraiths The Coming of the Horseclans and the series it spawns series by Robert Adams no relation to yours truly is a post apocalyptic, pulp fiction series that doesn t take itself too seriously It is about gory battles, psychic animals, a brutal world, and larger than life heroes and villains Or as the author himself put it The following tale is a fantasy, pure and simple It is a flight of sheer imagination It contains no hidden meanings, and none should be read into it none of the sociological, economic, political, religious, or racial messages with which far too many modern novels abound are herein contained The Coming of the Horseclans is, rather, intended for the enjoyment of any man or woman who has ever felt a twinge of that atavistic urge to draw a yard of sharp, flashing steel and with a wild war cry recklessly spur a vicious stallion against impossible odds.The tale is set in a 27th century post apocalyptic America, where a past nuclear and biological war has completely transformed the world The protagonist Milo of Morai, a mutant from the 20th century, has survived all these centuries, returning now to the horseclans he helped create to fulfill his own prophecy by leading them to their ancestral homeland Well, sort of Naturally, the journey is fraught with danger, as the clans cross a near unrecognizable America where decadent city dwellers, other Immortals, and vicious survival rules the day.What drew me to this series back in the early 1980s was the concept of the story and the amazing, pulp covers Being a huge lover of sword and sorcery fiction by Robert E Howard and others at the time, this book seemed like a can t miss for my reading tastes I mean, if I loved Conan the Barbarian fighting wizards and monsters across the Hyborean world of the distant past, why wouldn t a story of a post apocalyptic world where nomadic warriors Think Mongolian horde with mutant horses , telepaths, ancient technology, and Immortals fighting for control of the world not entertain me It was pulp fiction fun with a modern twist A can t miss like I said.Now, to be completely transparent, I didn t like this novel or the series as much as I wanted to It was a bit too brutal for my tastes back then The heroes and villains too violent, too callous, and too prone to rape anyone who didn t move out of the way quick enough The plot lines fairly straight forward and predictable And the writer s style was adequate but never very refined So while I did read several books after this one, I soon lost interest and never returned.Even with my lack of love, I still feel this book and the Horseclans series in general is one which should not be forgotten For its time, it was a thrilling, realistic, pulp fiction story which was short The longest novel was only 253 pages The average length of a novel was 202 , violent yet realistic The author was a Vietnam veteran who understood the horrors of combat and their aftermath , and mixed science fiction with fantasy into a nice mixture So I d encourage lovers of pulp fiction to go out, grab copies of this and the first few books, and see if this adventure series is the entertainment you crave.


  2. says:

    Reread May 2017 I was an avid follower of Robert Adams Horseclans novels when they first came out in the late 70s early 80s, 1 though my interest began to flag as I grew older and grew less and less comfortable with Adams raging homophobia That and I was growing away from the simplistic military sf that the Horseclans novels were a part of Even so, I came to regret leaving my copies at my mother s when we cleaned out the house after her death So I surrendered to nostalgia recently and downloaded the Kindle versions of books 1 and 7, Horseclans Odyssey, the two I remembered as being my favorites.The premise of the series is simple enough Toward the end of the 20th century, a nuclear and biological holocaust along with some natural disasters destroyed our civilization Milo Morai is a mutant an immortal creature with Wolverine like regenerative powers He rescues a group of orphans in Los Angeles, taking them east into the Great Plains, where he lays the groundwork for their culture a mix of Native and Mongolian nomadic traditions that would stand them in good stead in the world s new circumstances He also left them a prophecy that a leader would take them back to Ehlai at some time He then left to find a reputed island where other immortals had gathered Several centuries later, he returns to the Horseclans, who have come to dominate the plains from Canada into Mexico, becomes their War Leader, and begins to lead them back to their fabled homeland though since LA and its surrounds are still a radioactive wasteland or under water, he fudges the prophecy and points them further eastward This is where The Coming of the Horseclans opens The clans are crossing the Appalachians and confronting the medieval like kingdoms of the former eastern United States And if that weren t enough, Adams introduces ghosts from Milo s past Far to the south in erstwhile Florida , a group of scientists plot to seize control of their former country and restore the U.S to its former glory Holy Make America Great Again , Batman They too are immortal but have achieved this through science a vile process of transferring their brains from host body to host body down the centuries.You re going to have to have a strong stomach if you want to read these novels Adams was a vet and had a keen interest in ancient and medieval warfare, which is clearly evident whenever he writes about battles, weapons, armor, or and I have to give him credit the trauma that goes with all the bloody fighting As an example, Aldora, one of the immortals introduced in this book, is an 11 year old girl brutally raped by her Horseclan captors She, of course, escapes that hell but she grows up to be a very troubled woman in subsequent books.Beyond any moral qualms you may have when reading these books, the writing is let s be honest competent but not all that good Adams knows how to tell a story and move things along usually but the characters are shallow and predictable and their motivations simplistic Morality is Manichaean the good guys are honorable, trustworthy, brave, etc., and the bad guys are irredeemable and often gay If he had incorporated characters like Aldora or stretched his story telling talents see below , the brutal reality of his world would have been acceptable tolerable As it is, often the writing comes across like a B movie script where the writers fall back on rape and over the top debauchery to identify the bad guys.I don t want to climb too high on this soapbox If you like the series than I used to, I m not going to think you re morally bankrupt or that your reading taste is suspect Far from it I ve got plenty of books on these shelves that are by no sane measure good but that I love and movies, a shout out to Zardoz This review is purely self reflection I ve come to desire thoughtfulness and insight even from books I read just for pleasure.My post apocalyptic reading choices got better, I like to think, even at the time I discovered A Canticle for Leibowitz and Edgar Pangborn before I left for college More recently, I ve enjoyed Riddley Walker and The Country of Ice Cream Star, among other examples All mentioned here, I cannot recommend highly enough 2 I can t recommend the Horseclans novels now They were fun when I was 14 but they can t hold my interest any longer Though I m still going to reread 7 soon I recall thinking it was a lot like REH s Beyond the Black River, in that it was a departure from the usual Horseclans book and was better because Adams was stretching himself as a writer just as Howard had done in the short story Hopefully, my memory will be vindicated __________________________________ 1 For those following the timeline of my life, I would have been 8 when this book was first published, though I probably didn t get a copy of it until I was around 11 or 12 at the earliest Most likely, later around 13 or 14.This was also the time when I was deep into RPGs and the country was going through the last spasms of the Cold War Threads, The Day After and Damnation Alley were popular films, and my friends and I were into post apocalypse games like Gamma World, Aftermath and Project Morrow My room was littered with maps of a post WW3 America where half the coasts had sunk beneath the waves, mutants roamed the ruins of our cities, and humans eked out a precarious existence living in barbarous kingdoms 2 As I was drafting this review, I also remembered Andre Norton s Daybreak 2250 A.D. 3 I should mention two things about the e book edition One, the proofing is atrocious Someone must have scanned in a hard copy and given the results only a cursory glance Two, somewhen they tacked on a second, tedious prologue and inserted a scene mid book where Aldora befriends a mutated otter Neither are necessary nor particularly interesting I feel I m watching Greedo shoot first.___________________________________I read this series in my callow youth The first half dozen or so are decent reading but if got harder and harder for me to get past the excessive homophobia and anti clericalism.


  3. says:

    Fans of military fantasy with Sword Sorcery traits will enjoy this David Gemmell and Karl Wagner were better writers, but fans of theirs would enjoy this opener of the Horseclans series The premise is ostensibly apocalyptic sci fi, but really it appears as a gritty epic fantasy i.e no bullets or lasers or machines, just barbarian hordes, swords and some mutant telepathy and immortality mixed in Cover artist Ken Kelly did a superb job, and arguably was successful than the author in presenting creating the world Truthfully, it is worth tracking these out of print books down just for the cover art It is an interesting opening book, and since I am compelled to read the next book Swords of the Horesclans I rate it 4 5.


  4. says:

    I found the contents of this book so foul that I have refused to read another single word by this author for the decades since I read it I would rate it zero stars if the platform allowed it I have cherished books since the age of six and have tried my best to take care of the physical books I own If I still had a copy of this book, I would destroy it without hesitation.


  5. says:

    The first in the Horseclans series I give it four stars mainly for that It s a good story but probably 3 and a half stars might be a better rating I m not a big fan of undying heroes since it seems relatively easy to be a hero if you don t have to worry about actually getting killed.


  6. says:

    Review originally appeared in FantasyLiterature.com After two centuries, the undying High Lord Milo Morai has returned to the Horseclans to lead them to their prophesied destiny First they must conquer their enemies and the Witchmen pre holocaust scientists who have continued living by transplanting their minds into stolen bodies.I stole most of that synopsis from the back of the book, because I only made it to page sixty nine, the end of chapter six, and I still hadn t gotten to the meat of the story.I ve wanted to get my hands on a copy of The Coming of the Horseclans for a while now When I was a kid, I remember seeing these books on the grocery store magazine shelves or drugstore spinner racks, and later on at the mall bookstores in the Men s Adventure section I was already a fan of Conan and some other lesser known sword sorcery heroes, and just the name, Horseclans, stirred my blood Add that to the exciting cover illustrations, which I now know were done by Ken Kelly, and I can t explain why I never picked one up back then Most likely, I was just broke So, I really wanted to like this book and follow the rest of the series, which is eighteen books total.However, my nostalgia for old books I hadn t read didn t prove strong enough to carry me through The two prologues that s right, two, titled Prologue I and Prologue II were sheer torture to read No lie, I could hear Ben Stein s monotone voice as I read them I hoped that once I got to the story, things would pick up, but they didn t.I found nothing interesting about the hero, Milo Morai He s the typical macho character found in way too many cookie cutter action adventures He has it all good looks, skills per Napoleon Dynamite, Girls only want boyfriends who have great skills , wealth, and brains He doesn t seem to be killable, or at least I never got to a point in the story that told of any Achilles heel He knows how to telepathically communicate with horses and cats of the sabre tooth variety Women can t resist him They don t even mind much when he enslaves them, which is kinda the Horseclans thing.The Horeseclans are basically a post apocalyptic version of the Huns They wander the far future North American plains, raiding the local farmers and doing some trade business with the slaves and the plunder they acquire Up to the point I stopped reading, they seem to be the dominating bad asses of their time, which is helped by the fact that their enemies stupidly fall for any strategic trap Milo sets for them Enemies that are so vile they sexually abuse and murder young boys and so idiotic, I can t imagine why any subordinates would ever indulge them And don t even get me started on the unpronounceable languages of all these people.Adams takes the long way around to get to a point Granted, maybe I would have gotten some clarification eventually if I d have stuck with it But I just couldn t get motivated enough to bother For a tale that is supposedly rife with combat and barbarian warriors, I was bored Even the potential of sexy slave women couldn t rouse my interest With all due respect to the late Robert Adams, I think these stories are just dated Perhaps genre fiction of the mid seventies, especially the adventurous sci fi fantasy geared toward a male readership, wasn t taken as seriously by publishers back then as it is nowadays The Coming of the Horseclans lacks sophistication and uniqueness when compared to current books of similar genre.Maybe I didn t give Adams a fair shot HORSECLANS fans, feel free to set me straight I sincerely want to know if I just don t get it.


  7. says:

    I ve heard about the Horseclans novels for some time, first in Maureen Birnbaum Barbarian Swordsperson a send up, obviously and then from other sources So when I saw quite a beat up copy at a library sale, I had to pick it up.This first novel is interesting, so far as Future Regressed fantasy novels go The characters occasionally do telling than I d like to appraise this or that listener and the reader of this or that bit of history, but I suppose Adams has to get the notes he s built the novel on across to us somehow.There s some homophobia involved, but Adams does have one character claim the vilified characters are practicing a perversion of his race s Greek customs Really, what s being decried is mainly child rape Interestingly, though, apparently heterosexual rape is okay, so long as the victim is of a proper age.All in all, I don t know how to take Adams yet On the one hand, he presents his world in a this is how things are now fashion, and, as I know it s to some extent how things have been, it s hard to fault him too much On the other hand, he does present a character from a civilized time who doesn t bat an eye, mostly, at what the world has become.So I can t decide whether Adams is some starry eyed atavist, or a writer who sees himself telling it like it is, if you follow me I scored quite a few of these at a library sale, though, so I think I m going to see where he goes.


  8. says:

    It lost me at the line about the captive women taken by the hero s warband being well raped NOPE I can t just give it a single star because it may get better, it may subvert that, it may critique that, but so far it hasn t and I m done.


  9. says:

    Ok, I haven t read these in 30 years, and I m getting ready to read them again, so I may change this rating Others have explained the storyline I want to talk about why it was great to me, as a young adult, reading this author This was one of the most influential series to me in my teen days After Lord of the Rings, The Belgariad, and the Hitchhiker s series, it still stands among my favorites to this day Perhaps not for the high quality of the writing so much as what I learned from the author It has always bothered me when someone says after having read a book, or having given up on one, that There are chapters that don t mean anything, or What was the point of that scene or The author loves to fill space with unnecessary trivial information, or There were flashbacks that were unnecessary I think to myself, do these people understand that they are reading fiction, and not Non Fiction This guy Robert Adams got it, though, and was instrumental in teaching me the truth at a very young age that fictional stories don t have to mean anything And every chapter doesn t have to stay on a single linear track towards the end and make a point They are not essays They exist purely for entertainment purposes, not to give meaning to life Every reader should be reminded to suspend belief and try to enjoy themselves before reading a work of fiction Yes, I think maybe that should be international law Not that the Horseclans stories strayed from the storyline a lot They didn t But the Author constantly reminding me to take them with a grain of salt and to just enjoy them, and then by telling such an involved and entertaining story really put weight behind his words Where a lesser writer might have let the message get lost along the way, his words allowed me to have a greater appreciation for so many other authors I might not have read had I not already learned to open my mind as I opened the pages of a book.Anyway, my point is, these books were just sheer entertainment, a guilty pleasure, and anyone who likes a good juicy sword and sorcery tale with some technology eventually added because the story is set a few centuries after the fall of our society should enjoy it and most of the series I m thinking especially teen boys would love them the most I believe I got tired of them around book 10, with the loss of one of my favorite characters, but I still read a few after that I think this was my favorite, I hope you make it that far This one was a close second if I recall


  10. says:

    The Horseclans series is probably the best blend of fantasy and SiFi I have ever read Pretty much something for everyone in these books Great characters, epic storyline, fantastic writings My highest recommendation