Redgauntlet – Multi-channel.co

Set In The Mid Eighteenth Century In The Fictitious Third Jacobite Rebellion, Redgauntlet Tells Of Darsie Latimer, A Student Of Law Who Becomes Embroiled In A Plot To Put Prince Charles Edward Aka, Bonnie Prince Charlie On The British Throne The Events In Redgauntlet Never Actually Took Place, But They Are Probable, And Form The Culmination Of Scott S Series Of Jacobite Novels


10 thoughts on “Redgauntlet

  1. says:

    From BBC Radio 4 Classical Seral A free adaptation by Robin Brooks of Scott s novel now set in the year 2035, in a fictional future Scotland.This is the second season of adaptations of some of Sir Walter Scott s most popular novels, with David Tennant as Walter Scott.Alan Fairford is destined to become a lawyer but is distracted from his studies by the sudden disappearance of his best friend Danny Latimer.Danny s absence seems to be connected with the sudden appearance of Stuart Galloway aka Redgauntlet who has business with Alan s father, Alexander.But who is Redgauntlet And what is his mission Alan Fairford sets out to find out the answers and hopefully to rescue his friend.Written by Robin Brooks.Produced and Directed by Clive Brill.A Brill production for BBC Radio 4.https www.bbc.co.uk programmes b049


  2. says:

    The Bride 4 Extra Debut Mike Harris adapts Sir Walter Scott s The Bride of Lammermoor The novel is set in the Lammermuir Hills of south east Scotland at the beginning of the 18th Century and tells of a tragic love affair between young Lucy Ashton and her family s enemy Edgar Ravenswood The Ashtons and Ravenswoods have been enemies for centuries but will a proposed union between the warring families finally bring peace Edgar Ravenswood Roshan RohatgiSir Walter Ashton Hugh RossLady Ashton Maureen BeattieLucy Ashton Joanne CumminsFrank Hayston Drew CainCraigengelt Robert HudsonCaleb Robert HudsonThe Marquis of Hamilton Bryan LarkinOld Ravenswood Bryan LarkinAilsie Gourley Beth TuckeyWalter Scott David TennantMusic Composed and performed by Ross Hughes and Esben TjalveViolin and viola Oliver LangfordIvanhoe Set in 1194 after the failure of the third Crusade, King Richard I is said to be in captivity in Austria after having been taken on his way back to England In his absence, his brother John is plotting to take over the throne.Wilfred of Ivanhoe, son of Cedric and one of the few remaining Saxon Lords, joined Richard in the Crusade but has been disinherited by his father for showing allegiance to a Norman Ivanhoe is rumoured to have come to the rescue of his King in his hour of need but has since disappeared Is he alive Rowenna the woman he loves anxiously waits for news.Ivanhoe Mark BonnarIsaac Henry GoodmanGurth Henry GoodmanCedric Christian RodskaRowena Laura MolyneuxGuilbert David TroughtonRebecca Sasha BeharElgitha Sasha BeharFitzurse Will AdamsdaleWamba Will AdamsdaleDe Bracy Nicholas MurchiePrince John Nigel CookePrior Aymer Edward MaxRedgauntlet Jacobean a person who lived in the Jacobean period.Jacobite a supporter of the deposed James II and his descendants Description Alan Fairford is destined to become a lawyer but is distracted from his studies by the sudden disappearance of his best friend Danny Latimer.Danny s absence seems to be connected with the sudden appearance of Stuart Galloway aka Redgauntlet who has business with Alan s father, Alexander But who is Redgauntlet And what is his mission Alan Fairford sets out to find out the answers and hopefully to rescue his friend.Alan Fairford Jacob Fortune LloydAlexander Clive RussellPeter Peebles Christian RodskaLily Galloway Olivia MorganStewart Galloway Forbes MassonRoller Hopkins Robert HudsonFindlay Robert HudsonWorkman Robert HudsonNanty Ewart Simon GreenallCozen Simon GreenallRegina Crosbie Allison McKenzieWalter Scott David TennantOS Voice Allison McKenzieDanny Latimer Paul ReadyJames Paul ReadyNixon Paul Ready


  3. says:

    I am going to be using the format recommended by Susan Bauer in this review.Grammar Stage Inquiry The WhatWhat is the most important event in the book, in which the character s change The most important event is when Darsie decides to leave the stability of Joshua Geddes s house and join with the blind fiddler Darsie does that because he isn t very smart none of Sir Walter Scott s heroes are smart.Logic Stage Inquiry The Why and How Is this novel fable or chronicle This is a chronicle Sir Walter Scott invented the genre of historical fiction.What does the central character s want He wants action and adventure He isn t very smart.What is standing in their way For the first part of the novel, his friends Granted, they have no power to stop him, but they are warning him of where his Quixotic dreams will take him.What strategies does the character s use to overcome their difficulties While Darsie doesn t suffer from common sense, he isn t stupid, either He s able to think quickly on his feet and adapt to new situations.Who is telling the story The first part of the novel is a series of letters written between the protagonist, Darsie Latimer, and his friend Alan Fairford Admittedly, it s not the most engaging beginning It makes some demands of the reader, given the lack of dialogue, yet it does provide a character sketch for the two gentlemen The back and forth between the two men s letters becomes really amusing after a while Fairford grants that Latimer may have had adventures, but he thinks he embellished the whole thing, and comes close to insulting the man.The background knowledge of the novel suggests that Redgauntlet is some sort of Byronic satanic figure Scott develops this tension in a very skilled way.Beginning and Ending What draws you in What is the resolution in the end What is the logical exhaustion, which demonstrates a philosophy about human nature Sir Walter Scott s skill as a narrator is on full display He takes a very dangerous and unwieldy approach by introducing the plot through letter writing Yet in the letter writing he uses the possible Redgauntlet character to tie both Darsie s and Fairford s adventures together I won t say so as not to give away anything.The ending is about as perfectly exhausted as one can expect in a story The philosophy in this work, as in many of Scott s works, is that the heroic age ended a generation ago.III Rhetorical Stage of Inquiry The So What Do you sympathize with the characters Which one s , and why I sympathize with both Fairford and Darsie, for I have been both men And Darsie is funny at times One of Walter Scott s heroes has to take up residence with a Quaker, and here is how he describes the blessing before the meal We settled to your breakfast after a blessing, or rather an extempore prayer, which the Spirit moved Joshua to prolong rather than I felt altogether agreeable After Darsie is captured and doesn t know where he is, he tries to ferret out his location from the serving wench The wench is the archetypal dumb blonde and parries all of his rather skillful questions with feigned or perhaps real idiocy.Did the writer s times affect him Scott s characters in this story aren t as affected by the Jacobite cause as others They are not tempted by the Bonnie Prince nor do they seek to overthrow the Crown Quite opposite.Is there an argument in this book Alan Fairford is often at pains to show Darsie that courage isn t simply fighting bravely in battle There is a civil courage that is courage enough to do what is right, and to spurn what is wrong courage enough to defend a righteous cause with hand and purse, and to take the part of the poor man against his oppressor, without fear of the consequences to himself Scott 47.Do you agree Is this work true about the human experience Very true We all know those who want to overthrow the gubmn t, but what stops them isn t fear or arms, but apathy in their comrades.


  4. says:

    When I grow up I m only going to study poetry Having wrestled with Redgauntlet for over a week before I finally managed to finish it, now I m not looking forward to having to read it again for my exams in a few weeks and I should consider myself lucky if I only have to reread it once No matter how thoroughly I annotate a text the first time I read it, I always miss out on something or a lot of things and have to go back and reread the text This isn t too bad when you re writing about poetry or a very good novella e.g Death in Venice, which I ve read at least five times in the last two months , but 600 pages of verbose prose peppered with Scottish brogue and legal latinicisms is a different matter And I m saying all this because I suspect it has clouded my appreciation of Scott s last Jacobite novel which to some is also his last masterpiece Maybe in other circumstances I would have enjoyed it a lot There s a lot of food for thought about Scottish oral literature and history in it which has made me want to seek out a few books on them although there isn t much of a plot There s also a sense of the book being very, well, Scottish, deeply planted in Scottish history and culture Edinburgh is a lot Scott obsessed so maybe it s not that clear in Glasgow or maybe it is since I don t walk past statues of Scott every day and still think of him as a real person not a myth , but the fact that a lot of the action in Redgauntlet is set in Dumfries which is where my uni has a second campus, does affect the way I read this book If anything it makes me embarrassed of how little I know about Scottish history and how little I ve seen of Scotland since I moved here It feels like Wandering Willie s Tale deserves a special mention It appears somewhere about 1 3 through the book and is, by everybody s admission, the best part of it So if Alan and Darsie s pointless banter annoys you and makes you want to abandon the book altogether, skip ahead and find the tale.


  5. says:

    BBC Classic Serial starts July 13 view spoiler A free adaptation by Robin Brooks of Scott s novel now set in the year 2035, in a fictional future Scotland.This is the second season of adaptations of some of Sir Walter Scott s most popular novels, with David Tennant as Walter Scott.Alan Fairford is destined to become a lawyer but is distracted from his studies by the sudden disappearance of his best friend Danny Latimer.Danny s absence seems to be connected with the sudden appearance of Stuart Galloway aka Redgauntlet who has business with Alan s father, Alexander.But who is Redgauntlet And what is his mission Alan Fairford sets out to find out the answers and hopefully to rescue his friend.Written by Robin Brooks hide spoiler


  6. says:

    Being the last of Scott s Jacobite novels, one might think that he might have started to go stale Luckily, nothing could be further from the truth, and Redgauntlet is one of his most entertaining Scott experiments with an epistolary style which breathes new life into this installment and produces a sense of intimacy he hadn t yet achieved The hero or heroes really also break the typical Scott mold, in that they are recognizably flawed Present are the improbable kinships that characterize Scott s novels but at least they don t take the form of a dues ex machina.Part mystery, part thriller, part action, and part comedy, Scott s tale of the last sputterings of the Jacobite casue may not be gripping, but it is certainly entertaining.


  7. says:

    The most enjoyable yet as I read through Scott s works chronologically The style of the first half, in letters between the staunch friends who drive the plot, set the scene clearly and move the action forward without too much maundering, Scott s usual failing They are a likeable pair, the subsidiary characters are well drawn with the usual sprinkling of eccentrics, and although this attempt to recover the throne for Charles Edward Stuart never actually happened, it s perfectly credible A pleasure to read, and recommended as a good introduction to Sir Walter s style.


  8. says:

    I like reading historical fiction about English history and this was a good story This was about the last attempt to put the last Stuart prince back on the English throne Luckily I read this on my Kindle and was able to look up the meaning to all the Scottish words I didn t know what they meant The Scottish brogue is difficult to read But it is a good story.


  9. says:

    I really struggled to get into this The layout of thirteen epistolary chapters followed by twenty three normal chapters is off putting to say the least The subject matter is dear to my heart but it takes so very long to get to it I don t mind epistolary fiction per se Dracula is brilliant but the gossip contained therein, combined with legalese and old fashioned syntax, was just too much for my sensibilities and, having expected an adventure novel, I was so very disappointed I also found the Latin and Gaelic expressions in capital letters took my attention away from what mattered within those chapters Maybe I will get back to it when my mood is better but it killed it for me.


  10. says:

    It would be accurate to say I liked roughly the final half The first third of the book was letters exchanged between characters and DRY in the extreme When the story of a fictional Jacobite uprising toward the end of 18th century finally got under way the book improved considerably Readers must bear in mind, however, that the language used by the esteemed author was from the period and often difficult to interpret Those interested in Jacobite history should keep in mind that although the author was himself a Scotsman, he possessed little or no sympathy for adherents to King James and his bonny son, Prince Charles Edward in reclaiming the thrones of Scotland and England.