Kindle multi channel.co ô Romans de la Table Ronde Erec et Enide Cligés Lancelot

Four romances from the legends of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table Erec et Enide Cliges Yvain and LancelotChrétien de Troyes was a French poet and trouvère who flourished in the late 12th century Little is known of his life but he seems to have been from Troyes or at least intimately connected with it and between 1160 and 1172 he served at the court of his patroness Marie of France Countess of Champagne daughter of Eleanor of Auitaine perhaps as herald at arms as Gaston Paris speculated His work on Arthurian subjects represents some of the best regarded of medieval literature Chrétien de Troyes is generally considered as the first identified major French Language novelist Chrétien's works include five major poems in rhyming eight syllable couplets Four of these are complete and included within this book; Erec and Enide c 1170; Cligès c 1176; Yvain the Knight of the Lion; and Lancelot the Knight of the Cart both written simultaneously between 1177 and 1181


10 thoughts on “Romans de la Table Ronde Erec et Enide Cligés Lancelot Yvain

  1. says:

    This is the old and obsolete WW Comfort prose translation from the early twentieth century he offered FOUR Arthurian romances by Chretien de Troyes excluding the fifth Perceval Since they are out of copyright these translations are now being reprinted complete or one at a time They are usually available very cheaply I suggest getting all four in one file like this one if you are interested and can't afford the modern translations


  2. says:

    In university I was once so fascinated by the Arthurian romances of Chretien de Troyes that I considered a career as a medievalist Here we find the element of the marvellous some exciting descriptions of jousting and fighting psychological depth comedy and of course the exaltation of loveThe translation of the poetry into modern French prose makes the four stories in this collection uite readable However two of the stories have been greatly abridged and this is my most serious objection to the volume Had the editor not cut out such huge hunks it might have necessitated splitting the material into 2 smaller volumes but I don't think that would have been such a bad idea


  3. says:

    I had to read Erec as part of my studies in Middle High German please don't ask me how learning to translate Old and Middle High German into normal German was essential to studying it I still don't know So when I saw this English translation read by the brilliant Nicholas Boulton I thought meh Why not 17 hours listening to the man is time well spent But sadly even the great narration didn't make up for the sheer mind numbing boredom I felt narration 4 starsstory 2 not my thing stars


  4. says:

    This is the old and obsolete WW Comfort prose translation from the early twentieth century he offered FOUR Arthurian romances by Chretien de Troyes excluding the fifth Perceval Since they are out of copyright these translations are now being reprinted complete or one at a time They are usually available very cheaply I suggest getting all four in one file like this one if you are interested and can't afford the modern translations


  5. says:

    How can you possibly review a collection of stories which are than 800 years old and which were a huge influence on Arthurian legend as a whole?You can't I think ratings and reviews should compare books to others within the same general area There would be no point comparing an ancient Greek play a biography a YA vampire novel an academic study and so on to each other because they aren't comparable I've decided to give Four Arthurian Romances a rating of four stars on this basis Held up to a modern novel the stories ramble the characters are entirely unbelievable the level of detail and indeed many of the details themselves are beyond excessive the But none of this is the point Britain is a country rich in legend some of the most popular of which is Arthurian and we owe substantial parts of this to de Troyes Probably one of the most well know stories is that of the Arthur Lancelot Guenevere love triangle and this is based largely on his Lancelot the Knight of the Cart which is the last story in this collection This is where the pleasure in reading this book lies It is absolutely fascinating to read such early and significant versions of these legendsI started reading this book in old French but after so many near brain explosions I admit to being a bit cheeky and switching to a Project Gutenburg version in English My version had extensive endnotes which while being a bit of a pain on an e reader hugely improved my understanding and stopped me from getting too lost Take Lancelot the Knight of the Cart for example do you know why riding in a cart was so shameful a man would gladly die rather than be subjected to it? Nah I didn't either I can't imagine how confused I'd've been without the endnotes so I would definitely recommend getting a version with them included


  6. says:

    This book is uiet good thinking that this book was chooses by my school to read I really liked it


  7. says:

    Matching Soundtrack King Crimson Prince Rupert Awakes


  8. says:

    How do you write a review of a classice that set the stage for a thousand King Arthur stories to follow? Each one follows a distinct troubadour esue storyline of an undefeatable hero who has the love and adoration of a Special Lady Each one has a variationexcept the one that is written by his patroness Marie Countess of Champagne Eleanor of Auitaine's daughter That one is about Lancelot and Guinevere and involves the heroic knight actually sleeping with Guinevere and uh no one tells King Arthur at all It's great Also it appeared that de Troyes uit writing it Anyway these were entertaining but got repetitive


  9. says:

    There are some great stories in here that I am surprised are not already depicted in movies and art The idea of a man crossing a bridge that is a sword is incredible The story of Cliges and the faithful Fenice is romantic Poor Enide is the most noble lady I have read of in King Arthur's Court Yvain was sort of a moron but I was interested to see the element of the ring giving and the promising to return in a year since it is common in Norse and English fairy tales


  10. says:

    Audible Nicholas Boulton Narrator Nicholas Boulton brings these medieval courtly romances alive I recommend this to those who hesitate to listen to medieval poetry That Chretien appreciated and liked women is clear in these stories Erec and Enide 1 8; Cliges 9 15 love sickness and hi jinks and gruesome torture; Yvain 16 24 in which we learn about Sir Kay he of the barbed tongue; Lancelot 25